disapprove


disapprove
disapprove, deprecate mean to feel or to express an objection to or condemnation of a person or thing.
Dis-approve implies an attitude of dislike or distaste on any good grounds (as social, ethical, or intellectual) and an unwillingness to accept or to praise; the word may sometimes connote rejection or the expression of condemnation
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Gard loved his sister, but there were times when he wished for a way of making her understand how thoroughly he disapproved of her— Mary Austin

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disapproved of too much knowledge, on the score that it diminished men's sense of wonder— Huxley

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Deprecate stresses the implication of regret, frequently profound, occasionally diffident or apologetic
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shaping the plays to modern taste by the very excisions which scholars will most deprecateFitzGerald

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Wallace earnestly deprecates the modern tendency to disparage reason— Inge

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there is nothing I more deprecate than the use of the Fourteenth Amendment ... to prevent the making of social experiments— Justice Holmes

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Analogous words: reprehend, reprobate, censure, *criticize: *decry, disparage
Antonyms: approve
Contrasted words: *commend, recommend, applaud, compliment: endorse, sanction (see APPROVE)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Disapprove — Dis ap*prove, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Disapproved}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Disapproving}.] [Pref. dis + approve: cf. F. d[ e]approuver. Cf. {Disapprobation}.] 1. To pass unfavorable judgment upon; to condemn by an act of the judgment; to regard as wrong,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • disapprove — I (condemn) verb admonish, animadvert, belittle, berate, brand, call to account, cast aspersions on, cast blame upon, castigate, cavil, censure, chastise, chide, criticize, debase, declaim against, decry, denounce, denunciate, deprecate,… …   Law dictionary

  • disapprove of — index decry, discriminate (treat differently), regret Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • disapprove — late 15c., disprove; as the reverse of approve it is first attested 1640s. See DIS (Cf. dis ) + APPROVE (Cf. approve). Related: Disapproved; disapproving …   Etymology dictionary

  • disapprove — [v] condemn blame, censure, chastise, criticize, damn, decry, denounce, deplore, deprecate, detract, disallow, discommend, discountenance, disesteem, disfavor, dislike, dismiss, dispraise, expostulate, find fault with, find unacceptable, frown on …   New thesaurus

  • disapprove — ► VERB ▪ have or express an unfavourable opinion. DERIVATIVES disapproval noun disapproving adjective …   English terms dictionary

  • disapprove — [dis΄ə pro͞ov′] vt. disapproved, disapproving 1. to have or express an unfavorable opinion of; consider (something) wrong; condemn 2. to refuse to approve; reject vi. to have or express disapproval (of) disapprovingly adv …   English World dictionary

  • disapprove */ — UK [ˌdɪsəˈpruːv] / US [ˌdɪsəˈpruv] verb [intransitive] Word forms disapprove : present tense I/you/we/they disapprove he/she/it disapproves present participle disapproving past tense disapproved past participle disapproved to not approve of… …   English dictionary

  • disapprove — dis|ap|prove [ ,dısə pruv ] verb intransitive * to not approve of someone or something: She wanted to confide in Alan, but was frightened he might disapprove. disapprove of: Why do you always have to disapprove of everything I do? strongly… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • disapprove — v. 1) to disapprove completely, strongly, thoroughly, utterly 2) (D; intr.) to disapprove of (they disapproved strongly of my proposal) * * * [ˌdɪsə pruːv] strongly thoroughly utterly to disapprove completely (D; intr.) to disapprove of (they… …   Combinatory dictionary


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